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Building Canada’s Cleantech Workforce: Opportunities and Challenges


Building Canada’s Cleantech Workforce: Opportunities and Challenges

The potential market for Canada’s cleantech sector may have grown exponentially in the last few years, largely driven by increasing global demand for cleantech solutions and the billions of private and public investments available to Canadian researchers, developers, producers, and adopters.

Cleantech activities and jobs practically permeate every industry, occupation, and geography in Canada. While economic and workforce data is regularly tracked among cleantech developers and producers, data to encapsulate the whole economy – with every aspect of the supply chain included, is sporadic and quite limited.

Learn more about ECO Canada’s latest research on the cleantech sector and its workforce.

Topics to be covered include:

  • Global and Canadian trends in cleantech activity
  • ECO Canada’s definitional framework for cleantech, the sector, and its workforce
  • Business and HR insights from a survey of 81 businesses active in cleantech
  • Key considerations to address labour market opportunities and challenges for the sector

This webinar session is suitable for businesses, governments, education and training institutions, and individuals interested in advancing or navigating Canada’s cleantech labour market.

Headshot (2)

Claudine Vidallo

Director of Research, ECO Canada

Claudine Vidallo is a strategic planner, business analyst and program manager and has initiated, lead, executed and evaluated multi-stakeholder, and multi-phased projects. She is a certified Project Management Professional (PMP) with a Business Management background.

In the last 20 years, Claudine has applied her competencies in various industries in the Philippines and Canada including food and beverage manufacturing, energy, post-secondary and training institutions, and not-for-profit organizations. In the last decade, she has initiated, managed and delivered labour market studies and workforce programs for Canada’s petroleum and environmental sectors in key leadership roles within the PetroLMI Division of Energy Safety Canada and ECO Canada respectively.

geni photo

Geni Peters, PhD

LMI Manager, ECO Canada

Geni Peters is an economist with a Ph.D. in Economics from Texas A&M University. As Labour Market Information (LMI) Manager at ECO Canada, she is responsible for the management, execution and delivery of environmental LMI projects, working with an army of professionals comprised of staff, consultants, strategic advisors and subject matter experts.

Before joining ECO Canada, Geni applied her knowledge and skills in a wide range of roles and industries. She worked as a lecturer for 14 years, teaching a wide range of economics courses and supervising student research projects at UC San Diego and Penn State University. More recently, she managed labour market research initiatives including economic modelling and reporting at PetroLMI Division of Energy Safety Canada (formerly the Petroleum Human Resources Council) and conducted economic research and analysis at Brown Economic Consulting.

+ Overview

Building Canada’s Cleantech Workforce: Opportunities and Challenges

The potential market for Canada’s cleantech sector may have grown exponentially in the last few years, largely driven by increasing global demand for cleantech solutions and the billions of private and public investments available to Canadian researchers, developers, producers, and adopters.

Cleantech activities and jobs practically permeate every industry, occupation, and geography in Canada. While economic and workforce data is regularly tracked among cleantech developers and producers, data to encapsulate the whole economy – with every aspect of the supply chain included, is sporadic and quite limited.

Learn more about ECO Canada’s latest research on the cleantech sector and its workforce.

Topics to be covered include:

  • Global and Canadian trends in cleantech activity
  • ECO Canada’s definitional framework for cleantech, the sector, and its workforce
  • Business and HR insights from a survey of 81 businesses active in cleantech
  • Key considerations to address labour market opportunities and challenges for the sector

This webinar session is suitable for businesses, governments, education and training institutions, and individuals interested in advancing or navigating Canada’s cleantech labour market.

+ Experts
Headshot (2)

Claudine Vidallo

Director of Research, ECO Canada

Claudine Vidallo is a strategic planner, business analyst and program manager and has initiated, lead, executed and evaluated multi-stakeholder, and multi-phased projects. She is a certified Project Management Professional (PMP) with a Business Management background.

In the last 20 years, Claudine has applied her competencies in various industries in the Philippines and Canada including food and beverage manufacturing, energy, post-secondary and training institutions, and not-for-profit organizations. In the last decade, she has initiated, managed and delivered labour market studies and workforce programs for Canada’s petroleum and environmental sectors in key leadership roles within the PetroLMI Division of Energy Safety Canada and ECO Canada respectively.

geni photo

Geni Peters, PhD

LMI Manager, ECO Canada

Geni Peters is an economist with a Ph.D. in Economics from Texas A&M University. As Labour Market Information (LMI) Manager at ECO Canada, she is responsible for the management, execution and delivery of environmental LMI projects, working with an army of professionals comprised of staff, consultants, strategic advisors and subject matter experts.

Before joining ECO Canada, Geni applied her knowledge and skills in a wide range of roles and industries. She worked as a lecturer for 14 years, teaching a wide range of economics courses and supervising student research projects at UC San Diego and Penn State University. More recently, she managed labour market research initiatives including economic modelling and reporting at PetroLMI Division of Energy Safety Canada (formerly the Petroleum Human Resources Council) and conducted economic research and analysis at Brown Economic Consulting.